1. CATALOG INFORMATION
    1. Discipline: ENGLISH
    2. Subject Code and Number: ENGL M01B
      • Course Title:
      • Literature: Critical Thinking and Composition
        (Number of characters not restricted)
    3. Credit Course units: (Every 1 hour of lecture per week in a 17.5 week term = 1 unit.
      Every 3 hours of lab per week in a 17.5 week semester = 1 unit. Round down to the nearest half unit.)
      • Units: 3
      • Lecture Hours per week: 3
      • Lab Hours per week (if applicable): 0
      • Variable Units (if applicable): No
    4. Student Learning Hours:

      Lecture Hours: (Every 1 hour of classroom time requires 2 hours of study for 17.5 weeks.)

      • Classroom hours: 52.5 - 52.5
        (Example: Three hours of lecture per week for 17.5 weeks = 52.5 hours.)

      Laboratory/Activity Hours: (Laboratory/activity hours are based on the number of hours of laboratory/activity work in one week in a 17.5 week semester).

      • Laboratory/Activity Hours 0 - 0
        (Example: Three hours of lab per week for 17.5 weeks = 52.5 hours.)
      Total Combined Hours in a 17.5 week term: 52.5 - 52.5
      Total all of above hours to give grand sum
    5. Non-Credit Course hours per week  
    6. May be taken a total of:
      X 1   2   3   4 time(s) for credit
      (See XVIII for Repeatability Justification)
    7. Is the course co-designated (same as) another course:
      No   X Yes  
      If YES, designate course Subject Code & Number:  
    8. Course Description:

      Develops critical thinking and writing skills in close textual analysis of issues and themes in fiction, poetry, and drama as well as in non-fictional literature and literary criticism. Reviews deductive and inductive reasoning, recognition and avoidance of logical fallacies, and relationships between language and meaning while emphasizing detailed critical analysis.  

    9. Entrance Skills

      • *Prerequisite: No   Yes X Course(s)
          ENGL M01A or  ENGL M01AH or
      • *Corequisite: No X Yes   Course(s)
      • Limitation on Enrollment: No X Yes  
      • Recommended Preparation: No X Yes   Course(s)
      • Other: No X Yes  
    10. Other Catalog Information:

      Students cannot complete both ENGL M01B and ENGL M01BH courses because credit will only be awarded to the first course completed.  

  2. COURSE OBJECTIVES

    Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

    Methods of evaluation will be consistent with, but not limited by, the following types or examples.
    1 select evidence from a text to identify and respond to plot, setting, point of view, characters, tone, style, and theme of a literary work.
         objective examinations, class discussion, journal entries, reports, quizzes, essays

    2 develop and test hypotheses about the relationship of form and content in writing by recognizing the implications of literary forms and language patterns.
         objective examinations, class discussion, journal entries, reports, quizzes, essays

    3 explain how fiction, drama, and poetry reflect the author's cultural, moral, gender-based, psychological, and philosophical assumptions.
         objective examinations, class discussion, journal entries, reports, quizzes, essays, research paper

    4 identify the structure and main points of the literary critical essay.
         class discussion, journal entries, reports, quizzes, essays, research paper

    5 distinguish between fact and opinion and recognize a critic's individual and cultural perspective and bias.
         journal entries, reports, quizzes, essays, research paper

    6 produce a research paper, demonstrating familiarity with research techniques, note-taking, organization, and documentation using current MLA guidelines.
         essays, research paper

    7 compose essays, totaling 8,000 words, that effectively employ writing strategies appropriate to the course.
         objective examinations, class discussion, quizzes

    8 use critical thinking concepts and terms to connect evidence to logical conclusions.
         objective examinations, class discussion, journal entries, reports, quizzes, essays, research paper

    9 demonstrate an understanding of literary elements (such as theme and tone) using appropriate literary terms.
         objective examinations, class discussion, journal entries, reports, quizzes, essays, research paper

    10 use and evaluate various sources to interpret literature and create original arguments.
         journal entries, reports, essays, research paper

    11 identify rhetorical strategies and recognize formal and informal logical fallacies.
         objective examinations, class discussion, journal entries, reports, quizzes

    12 distinguish among fact, inference, and judgment in drawing conclusions.
         objective examinations, class discussion, quizzes

  3. COURSE CONTENT
    Estimated % Topic Learning Outcomes
    Lecture (must total 100%)
    25.00%
    Inductive and analytical reasoning, gathering of evidence and recognition of literary elements such as plot, setting, characters, point of view, tone, and style
    Inductive and deductive reasoning, development of inferences, clearly formulating premises, and drawing reasonable conclusions
    How literature reveals theme indirectly, through suggestion, implication, repetition, and accretion, and make inferences accordingly

    Appropriate literary examples of the above Formal elements of literature and their relationships Critical writing skills, such as clearly defining purpose, arguing thoroughly and logically, using relevant and accurately applied examples, and reaching logical, warranted conclusions
    Avoid logical fallacies such as over-generalization, over-simplification (especially stock response), and the either/or fallacy
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 12
    25.00%
    Relationship between language and meaning: recognizing implications of literary forms (genres) and rhetorical/linguistic literacy patterns
    Components of a critical essay: thesis, sub-thesis, evidence, and conclusions
    Logical strategies and possible formal and informal fallacies 

    Appropriate literary examples and relevant literary criticism
    Relations between form and content in literary examples
    Critical writing principles in which the connection between the analytical argument and the formal/rhetorical features of the literature are made clear
    1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11
    25.00%
    Formation and testing of hypotheses about literary themes
    Recognition of moral, psychological, gender-based, and philosophical assumptions, perspective, and biases using as examples works from various times and cultures
     
    Thematic development through several literary works of the same author or thematically comparable works of several authors
    Various forms of literary criticism (psychological, Marxist, feminist, etc)
    Synthesis thematic patterns in two or more works of the same author or in works of two different authors
    Logical fallacies and how to avoid them in writing Formation and testing of hypotheses about literary themes
    Recognition of moral, psychological, gender-based, and philosophical assumptions, perspective, and biases
     
    Thematic development through several literary works of the same author or thematically comparable works of several authors
    Various forms of literary criticism (psychological, Marxist, feminist, etc)
    Synthesis thematic patterns in two or more works of the same author or in works of two different authors
    Logical fallacies and how to avoid them in writing
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12
    25.00%
    Refinement and synthesis of critical thinking concepts and skills, and techniques of literary analysis
    Critical thinking principles applicable for understanding and evaluating complex arguments: recognize use for modal qualifiers and conceding and rebutting counter arguments
    Discern the cultural, social, gender-based, moral, and philosophical perspective of a writer through the study of a longer, sustained literary work (not necessarily fictional – e.g., Thoreau’s Walden)   

    Formulation of a complex thesis that reveals significance in a longer literary work and focused enough to provide intensive, precise scrutiny
    Library research techniques
    1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12
  4. TYPICAL ASSIGNMENTS
    1. Writing assignments
      Writing assignments are required. Possible assignments may include, but are not limited to:
      1

      thesis-driven critical essays on various literary genres.

      2

      reflections on assigned readings.

      3

      a research paper that follows current MLA guidelines.

      4

      essays requiring synthesis of two or more literary works.

      5

      persuasive essays that employ critical thinking skills and avoid logical fallacies.

    2. Appropriate outside assignments
      Appropriate outside assignments are required. Possible assignments may include, but are not limited to:
      1

      assigned writings.

      2

      cooperative group planning for oral presentations.

      3

      attendance/visitation at theatre, music, art, etc. performances/showings directly related to a course assignment.

      4

      assigned readings covering the major genres of fiction, poetry, and drama.

    3. Critical thinking assignments
      Critical thinking assignments are required. Possible assignments may include, but are not limited to:
      1

      analytical reflections on readings, films, current events, contemporary media, etc.

      2

      cooperative group planning for oral presentations.

      3

      group projects, such as locating an author in his or her historical, cultural and political context.

      4

      identifying themes of literary works.

      5

      formulating written literary-critical arguments.

      6

      revision of essays for focus, coherence, support, clarity, logic, and style.

  5. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION

    Methods of instruction may include, but are not limited to: (Check all that apply.)

    • X
    • Distance Education – When any portion of class contact hours is replaced by distance education delivery mode (Complete DE Addendum, Section XV)
    •  
    • X
    • Lecture/Discussion
    •  
    • X
    • Laboratory/Activity
    •  
    • X
    • Other (Specify) Collaborative projects: oral presentation of researched material
    •  
    •  
    • Optional Field Trips
    •  
    • X
    • Required Field Trips
    •  
  6. METHODS OF EVALUATION
    Methods of evaluation may include, but are not limited to:

  7. REPRESENTATIVE TEXTS AND OTHER COURSE MATERIALS
    Ruggiero, Vincent.  Beyond Feelings: A Guide to Critical Thinking.  9th ed.   McGraw-Hill, 2011.
    Barnet, Sylvan, and William Cain.  Short Guide to Writing about Literature.  12th ed.   Longman, 2012.
    Abrams M.H., and Geoffrey Harpham.  A Glossary of Literary Terms.  10th ed.   Wadsworth, 2012.
    Hacker, Diana, and Nancy Sommers.  A Writer's Reference.  7th ed.   Bedford, 2011.
    Booth, Alison, and Kelly J. Mays.  The Norton Introduction to Literature.  10th ed.   Norton, 2010.
    Gwynn, R.S..  Literature: A Pocket Anthology.  5th ed.   Prentice Hall, 2012.
    Foster, Thomas.  How to Read Literature Like a Professor: A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines.   Harper, 2003.
    Novels or book-length works of instructor's choice.
    Thematic Option: an instructor who organizes the course around a theme (e.g., “Conformity and Rebellion”) will choose texts that are similarly focused. A typical book list for the above theme might include:
    Osborne, John. Look Back in Anger. Penguin, 1982.
    Kesey, Ken. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. Penguin, 2002.
    Milgrim, Stanley. Obedience to Authority: An Experimental View. Harper, 2009.
    Walker, Alice. The Color Purple. Mariner, 2006.
    Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid’s Tale. Everyman's Library, 2006.
    Morrison, Toni. Beloved. Viking, 2004.
    Lewis, Sinclair. Babbit. Quill Pen Classics, 2008.
    Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Simon & Brown, 2011.
    Thoreau, Henry David. Walden or, Life in the Woods and “On Civil Disobedience.” Signet, 2004.
  8. STUDENT MATERIALS FEES
    X No
      Yes
    (Complete Section XVII for Student Materials Fee Addendum/Justification)
  9. PARALLEL COURSES

    List at least 3 comparable lower-division courses from CSU or UC. If no comparable courses are available at either CSU or UC, use other CA community college courses. Consult with the Articulation Officer, if needed.

    College Course Number Course Title Units
    CSU Northridge ENGL 255 Introduction to Literature 3
    CSU Los Angeles ENGL 250 Understanding Literature 4
    CSU Dominguez Hills ENG 111 Freshman Composition II 3
    CSU Fresno ENGL 20 Introduction to Literature 4
  10. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS
    Courses Requiring a Masters Degree:
    Master’s in English, literature, comparative literature, or composition OR Bachelor’s in any of the above AND Master’s in linguistics, TESL, speech, education with a specialization in reading, creative writing, or journalism OR the equivalent.
  11. ARTICULATION INFORMATION
    1. Title V Course Classification:
      1. This course is designed to be taken either:
          Pass/No Pass only (no letter grade possible); or
        X Letter grade (P/NP possible at student option)
      2. Degree status:
        Either X Associate Degree Applicable; or   Non-associate Degree Applicable
    2. Moorpark College General Education:
      1. Do you recommend this course for inclusion on the Associate Degree General Education list?
        Yes: X No:   If YES, what section(s)?
          A1 - Natural Sciences - Biological Science
          A2 - Natural Sciences - Physical Science
          B1 - Social and Behavioral Sciences - American History/Institutions
          B2 - Social and Behavioral Sciences - Other Social Behavioral Science
          C1 - Humanities - Fine or Performing Arts
        X C2 - Humanities - Other Humanities
          D1 - Language and Rationality - English Composition
        X D2 - Language and Rationality - Communication and Analytical Thinking
          E1 - Health/Physical Education
          E2 - PE or Dance
          F - Ethnic/Gender Studies
    3. California State University(CSU) Articulation:
      1. Do you recommend this course for transfer credit to CSU? Yes: X No:  
      2. If YES do you recommend this course for inclusion on the CSU General Education list?
        Yes: X No:   If YES, which area(s)?
        A1           A2           A3 X         B1           B2           B3           B4          
        C1           C2 X         D1           D2           D3           D4           D5          
        D6           D7           D8           D9           D10           E          
    4. University of California (UC) Articulation:
      1. Do you recommend this course for transfer to the UC? Yes: X No:  
      2. If YES do you recommend this course for the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC)? Yes: X No:  
        IGETC Area 1: English Communication
            English Composition
        X   Critical Thinking-English Composition
            Oral Communication
        IGETC Area 2: Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning
            Mathematical Concepts
        IGETC Area 3: Arts and Humanities
            Fine Arts
        X   Humanities
        IGETC Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences
            Anthropology and Archaeology
            Economics
            Ethnic Studies
            Gender Studies
            Geography
            History
            Interdisciplinary, Social & Behavioral Sciences
            Political Science, Government & Legal Institutions
            Psychology
            Sociology & Criminology
        IGETC Area 5: Physical and Biological Sciences (mark all that apply)
            Physical Science Lab or Physical Science Lab only (none-sequence)
            Physical Science Lecture only (non-sequence)
           Biological Sciences
            Physical Science Courses
            Physical Science Lab or Biological Science Lab Only (non-sequence)
            Biological Science Courses
            Biological Science Lab course
            First Science course is a Special sequence
            Second Science course in a Special Sequence
           Laboratory Activity
           Physical Sciences
        IGETC Area 6: Language other than English
            Languages other than English (UC Requirement Only)
            U.S. History, Constitution, and American Ideals (CSU Requirement ONLY)
  12. REVIEW OF LIBRARY RESOURCES
    1. What planned assignment(s) will require library resources and use?
      The following assignments require library resources: Reading of literary works, literary critical essays, and biographical information. Research, using the Library's print and online resources, in order to write a research paper.
    2. Are the currently held library resources sufficient to support the course assignment?
      YES: X NO:  
      If NO, please list additional library resources needed to support this course.
  13. PREREQUISITE AND/OR COREQUISITE JUSTIFICATION
    (Courses with a Prerequisite and/or Corequisite must justify the requirement in one of the following ways.)

    Requisite Justification for ENGL M01A

    1. Sequential course within a discipline.
      Attach a list of the specific skills and/or knowledge the student must possess in order to demonstrate preparation. These skills must be noted in the prerequisite/corequisite Outline of Record.
      1. organize and compose a 7-10-page research paper incorporating and accurately documenting a variety of appropriate source materials.

      2. analyze a variety of essays and at least one book-length work.

      3. demonstrate critical thinking skills in oral and written discussion of assigned readings.

      4. identify and assess the main idea of essays and write clear, relevant responses in informal journal entries and formal essays.

      5. compose several expository papers from 2 to 10 pages long, totalling 8,000 words (35 pages), employing such skills as:
        --use of the stages of the writing process: generating ideas, drafting, revising, and editing.
        --awareness of audience and purpose.
        --clear statement of thesis, focus, or controlling idea.
        --logical organization.
        --full and convincing development of ideas, including appropriate rhetorical strategies, paragraph construction, effective transitions, and convincing support.
        --control of diction.
        --adherence to the conventions of standard written English.
      6. compose timed essay examinations with clear thesis, logical organization, convincing arguments, and specific supporting detail.

    2. X 
    3. Standard Prerequisite or Corequisite required by universities.
      List below, at least three (3) campuses of the University of California and/or the California State University systems that reflect in their catalogues equivalent courses with equivalent Prerequisites and/or Corequisites.
    4.   
    5. Corequisite is linked to companion lecture course.
    6.   
    7. Prerequisite or Corequisite is authorized by legal statute or regulation.
      Code Section:
    8.   
    9. Prerequisite or Corequisite is necessary to protect the students' health and safety.
    10.   
    11. Computation or communication skill is needed.
      If checked, Mathematics, English, or Reading must clearly be connected to the course content before it can be used as a necessary preparation for entry into the course. In those courses considered standard the rules cited above apply. These Prerequisites may be established for two (2) years and must be validated by research.
    12.   
    13. Performance courses: Audition, portfolio, tryouts, etc. needed.
      • If checked, there must be other options for completing the certificate or degree requirement. The COR for the certificate or degree must include a list of those courses that are alternatives to this course in completing the certificate or degree.
      • If checked, disproportionate impact research must be documented each semester
    14.   
    15. or

    Requisite Justification for ENGL M01AH

    1. Sequential course within a discipline.
      Attach a list of the specific skills and/or knowledge the student must possess in order to demonstrate preparation. These skills must be noted in the prerequisite/corequisite Outline of Record.
    2. X 
    3. Standard Prerequisite or Corequisite required by universities.
      List below, at least three (3) campuses of the University of California and/or the California State University systems that reflect in their catalogues equivalent courses with equivalent Prerequisites and/or Corequisites.
    4.   
    5. Corequisite is linked to companion lecture course.
    6.   
    7. Prerequisite or Corequisite is authorized by legal statute or regulation.
      Code Section:
    8.   
    9. Prerequisite or Corequisite is necessary to protect the students' health and safety.
    10.   
    11. Computation or communication skill is needed.
      If checked, Mathematics, English, or Reading must clearly be connected to the course content before it can be used as a necessary preparation for entry into the course. In those courses considered standard the rules cited above apply. These Prerequisites may be established for two (2) years and must be validated by research.
    12.   
    13. Performance courses: Audition, portfolio, tryouts, etc. needed.
      • If checked, there must be other options for completing the certificate or degree requirement. The COR for the certificate or degree must include a list of those courses that are alternatives to this course in completing the certificate or degree.
      • If checked, disproportionate impact research must be documented each semester
    14.   
    15. or
  14. WORKPLACE PREPARATION
    ENGL M01B: Not Applicable
  15. DISTANCE LEARNING COURSE OUTLINE ADDENDUM
    1. Mode of Delivery (Check all that apply)
      • X Online (course will be delivered 100% online)
      • X Online with onsite examinations (100% of the instruction will occur online, but examinations and an orientation will be scheduled onsite)
      • X Online/Hybrid (a percentage of instruction will be held online and the remaining percentage of instruction will be held onsite)
          Lab activities will be conducted onsite
      •   Televideo (Examinations and an orientation will be held onsite)
      •   Teleconference
      •   Other
    2. Need/Justification (What is the intent in offering the course by distance education?)

      Improve general student access.

    3. Describe how instructors teaching this course will ensure regular, effective contact with and among students.

      Instructors will ensure regular, effective contact with and among students through recorded lectures with required response in online discussion boards, regular office hours, both on site and virtual, frequent conferencing and email contact, use of online study groups or partners, and frequent assessment.

    4. Describe how instructors teaching this course will involve students in active learning.

      Instructors will involve students in active learning through recorded lectures with required response in online discussion boards, conferencing, online study groups or partners, research projects, frequent assessment and optional on-site activities.

    5. Explain how instructors teaching this course will provide multiple methods of content representation.

      Instructors will present content through online lectures, textbooks or virtual textbooks, multi-media files, interactive activities, conferencing, email, and frequent assessment.

    6. Describe how instructors teaching this course will evaluate student performance.

      Instructors will evaluate student performance through conferencing, recorded language production, performance on interactive activities, on group and pair assignments, essays, and assessments including an online final exam.

  16. General Education Course Outline Addendum

    General Education Division of Learning [check all applicable boxes]:

    Check either Option 1 or Option 2

    • X
    • OPTION #1: Moorpark College has already received approval from the CSU and/or UC systems for this course to fulfill a GE requirement. Note: This option applies only to technical revisions and updated courses.
    •  
    • OPTION #2: Moorpark College has not received approval from the CSU and/or UC systems for this course to fulfill a GE requirement. This option applies to all new and substantively revised courses.
  17. Student Materials Fee Addendum
    ENGL M01B: Not Applicable
  18. Repeatability Justification Title 5, Section 55041
    ENGL M01B: Not Applicable
  19. CURRICULUM APPROVAL
    1. Course Information:
      1. Discipline: ENGLISH
      2. Discipline Code and Number: ENGL M01B
      3. Course Revision Category: Technical Course Revision
    2. Course Proposed By:
      1. Originating Faculty Kara Lybarger-Monson 10/27/2011
      2. Faculty Peer: Jerry Mansfield 10/27/2011
      3. Curriculum Rep: Jerry Mansfield 10/27/2011
      4. Department Chair: Sydney Sims 11/26/2011
      5. Division Dean: Inajane Nicklas 11/14/2011
    3. Approved By:
      1. Curriculum Chair: Mary Rees 01/15/2012
      2. Executive Vice President: Lori Bennett 02/01/2012
      3. Articulation Officer: Letrisha Mai 12/14/2011
      4. Librarian: Mary LaBarge 12/09/2011
    4. Implementation Term and Year: Fall 2012
    5. Approval Dates:
      1. Approved by Moorpark College Curriculum Committee: 01/10/2012
      2. Approved by Board of Trustees (if applicable):
      3. Approved by State (if applicable):